All Challenges

Reducing water pollution in textile value chain

Relevant regions : Bangladesh | China | Germany | Iceland | India | Indonesia | Japan |

Globally, it is estimated that over 200,000 tons of dyes are lost to effluents every year during the dyeing and finishing operations. Unfortunately, a large portion of these dyes escape conventional wastewater treatment processes and contaminate the environment - mostly waterways. Besides, conventional chemical physical treatment of dyeing waste water are energy and chemical intensive, making them unsustainable for the long term. These necessitate the use of natural and bio-based treatment avenues for textile dyeing waste water.

What are the currently available bio-based solutions for textile dyeing wastewater treatment? What could the future hold for these?

Stakeholders

  • EHS professionals
  • Machinery and equipment makers
  • Production professionals
  • Synthetic fiber professionals
  • Textile and fashion designers
  • Textile chemicals professionals
  • Textile fiber cultivation professional
  • Textile industry sustainability professionals
  • Textile industry training professionals
  • Textile laundry and maintenance professionals
  • Textile printing professionals
  • Textile waste management professionals
  • Challenge questions

    How can textile wastewater treatment be made low-energy and low-carbon?

    Dec-2020

    Textile effluent treatments need elaborate stages and processes in order to ensure that the resulting water post treatment meets strict pollution control norms. As a result, significant amounts of energy are utilized in many stages of the textile industry wastewater treatment.

    Finding out sustainable and more efficient solutions for these energy applications can save significant amounts of greenhouse emissions, as well as money!

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Energy management professionals , Machinery and equipment makers , Textile industry sustainability professionals , Textile waste management professionals ,

    How can we minimize the amount of textile wastewater generated?

    Dec-2020

    The best way to treat waste is not to generate waste in the first place.

    While generating zero waste water might be difficult in textile processing, avenues that can significantly reduce the amount of wastewater produced during operations can go a long way in making textile industries more sustainable.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Energy management professionals , Production professionals , Researchers or innovators , Textile and fashion designers , Textile industry sustainability professionals , Textile waste management professionals ,

    How can the conventional methods for wastewater treatment (physical and chemical) be made more sustainable?

    Dec-2020

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Energy management professionals , Production professionals , Textile industry sustainability professionals , Textile waste management professionals ,

    How can bioremediation make textile wastewater treatment sustainable?

    Dec-2020

    While still constuting only a small portion of total dyes used for textiles, the use of natural dyes for textile yarn or fabric dyeing is on the increase.

    Though natural dyes are eco-friendly and also have significant health benefits compared to synthetic dyes, they are having very poor bonding with textile fiber materials, which necessitate mordanting with metallic mordants, some of which are not eco friendly. All these imply that customised remediation/treatment solutions are needed for waste water from textile dyeong units using natural and bio-based dyes.

    Let’s discuss the current trends and the emerging solutions for sustainable remediation of such textile dyeing waste water.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Energy management professionals , Entrepreneurs , Machinery and equipment makers , Production professionals , Textile industry sustainability professionals , Textile industry training professionals ,

    Are constructed wetlands feasible for treating textile dyeing wastewater bioremediation?

    Dec-2020

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) are an alternative method for wastewater treatment and its purification, including for textile dyeing waste water. Such wetlands are engineered systems that mimic the natural processes by removing the pollutants or by reducing the level of pollutants to a dischargeable limit. 

    Let’s discuss in detail the effective engineering and process pathways used in constructed wetlands for textile dyeing wastewater bioremediation.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Researchers or innovators , Textile industry sustainability professionals ,

    What are the optimal ways to handle biomass sludge that results from bioremediation of textile dyeing wastewater?

    Dec-2020

    Bioremediation of textile dyeing wastewater is normally carried out by the use of microorganisms to remove the pollution from the water. The microorganisms transform various toxic chemicals into less harmful forms. The wastewater treatment step concentrates the various pollutants in the wastewater into sludge, which is a pollutant.

    Even though bioremediation reduces the amount of sludge produced when compared with physicochemical processes, the sludge from the former must be treated with the same care. Its high pollution potentials make treatment before disposal to the environment a must. Currently, landfilling and incineration are the most common practices for textile sludge disposal, which has some adverse effects like leaching of heavy metals.

    The sludge thus needs to be handled suitably, as otherwise it negates the whole purpose of bioremediation.

    This E2 Challenge section at E2Expo discusses the optimal ways to handle biomass sludge that results from the bioremediation of textile dyeing wastewater.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Entrepreneurs , Machinery and equipment makers , Researchers or innovators , Textile industry sustainability professionals ,

    What types of enzymes/microbes play a role in decolorization and/or detoxification of textile dyeing wastewater?

    Dec-2020

    Enzymes are used for decolorization and degradation of dyes from textile waste waters. Many of these enzymes are easily available as they can be extracted from bacteria, fungi, algae, and plants. The enzyme-driven treatment system has been found to be effective for achieving satisfactory large-scale decolorization of dye-contaminated wastewater in less time, cost, labor, and ecological risk.

    Such enzyme-mediated decolorization of dye occurs through either degradation or biotransformation mechanism, and is limited only by the operational factors such as reactivity of dye, pH, temperature, co-substrate, and electron donor.

    All these point to these enzymes having significant potential for remediation of textile waste water from dyeing units.

    This E2 Challenge discussion focusses on the types of enzymes and microbes that play a role in the decolorization and/or detoxification of textile dyeing wastewater.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Entrepreneurs , Researchers or innovators , Textile industry sustainability professionals ,

    What are the latest advances in the membrane bioreactor technologies used for treatment for textile dyeing wastewater?

    Dec-2020

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) use a combination of the membrane and biological processes to process industrial wastewater. They are widely applied in the textile dyeing wastewater treatment.

    The main advantages of membrane processes compared with the chemical treatment of textile wastewater are: no usage of the chemicals, high quality of discharge water, and less production of excess sludge. This technology promises COD removal by as much as 97%, with no consumption of decolorizing chemicals. At the same time, MBRs are energy-intensive.

    This section at E2 Challenge discusses the pros and cons of using MBRs for treating textile indusrtry waste water, and also  the latest advances in these.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Energy management professionals , Entrepreneurs , Machinery and equipment makers , Marketing or sales professionals , Researchers or innovators , Textile industry sustainability professionals ,

    What is the potential for phytoremediation of textile dyeing wastewater? Which plants have the potential for the same?

    Dec-2020

    Phytoremediation attempts to use plants and microbes associated with plant root systems to remediate waste water through removal of organic and inorganic pollutants. It has the potential to reduce macro (N, P, K, and C), micro (B, Cu, Fe, and Mn) elements, and heavy metals (Cd, As, Pb and Cr). Under select conditions, they also have the potential to remediate color, turbidity, conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and biological oxygen demand (BOD).

    Phytoremediation thus can have a beneficial impact for the textile industry waste water treatment. 

    Phytoremediation for treating textile industry waste water is in its early stage of commercialization as of 2020. A variety of plant systems can be used for this.

    This E2 Challenge section from from E2Expo discusses the potential of phytoremediation for textile dyeing wastewater, and also the plants and plant species that can be used for the same.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Entrepreneurs , Marketing or sales professionals , Researchers or innovators , Textile industry sustainability professionals ,

    What microorganisms are effective in the treatment and removal of azo dyes from textile wastewater?

    Dec-2020

    Azo dyes are a class of aromatic dyes and represent a prominent class of largest commercial dyes used in textile dyeing.

    The conventional physicochemical methods used to treat the wastewater with azo dyes have disadvantages such as excessive use of chemicals and in sludge disposal. In addition, azo dyes are generally resistant to aerobic digestion and are stable to light and oxidizing agents.

    Bioremediation for the removal of dyes is gaining interest because it is environmentally friendly, and produces much less (harmful) sludge. In addition, biological treatment either by bacteria, fungi, or consortia of both has been reported to reduce the toxicity of azo dye to acceptable levels.

    In this section, we wish to discuss about the microorganisms that can be used in different microbial treatment methods for the removal of azo dyes from textile wastewater.

    Stakeholders : EHS professionals , Entrepreneurs , Marketing or sales professionals , Researchers or innovators , Textile industry sustainability professionals ,