Providing employment to bottom of pyramid in textile production

The upstream portion of the textile business value chain (for natural fiber) resides mostly in rural regions, and in developing, underdeveloped and least developed countries. Many large textile production units are also located in tier two and tier three towns in these regions.

 

Not surprisingly, a large portion of those working in the global textile sector belong to the bottom of the pyramid. But given the nature of the value chain, and also the end users who increasingly wish to see that the fashion and apparel they buy also provides significant social benefits, this industry has the potential to provide even more employment opportunities to the poorer sections of the society in the manufacturing regions.

Stakeholders

NGOs

Senior or top management

Textile fiber cultivation professional

Vital Stats

How does it work?

The upstream and midstream parts of the textile industry value chain have the potential to provide employment to millions of poor people worldwide.

Sustainability benefits

Employment for the poor (especially rural and semi-urban poor) in textile factories can make a dramatic difference to social sustainability in many regions of the world

Highlights/USP

With the increasing trend in sustainable practices for textile end of life stages, the fashion industry can also provide employment opportunities for many urban poor in developed countries in the waste management and recycling sectors.

Stage of commercialization

Not applicable

Types of professionals who can improve the solution

NGOs, Government and bureaucrats

Specifically relevant to any geography?

Decarbonization Potential

Not applicable

Value Chain

Textile yarn , Textile fabric production , Fabric dyeing and finishing ,

Carbon Focus

Solutions

Projects

Innovation

Launchpad

Topview

Debate

Library

Celebrate

Support Organisations

Web Resources

Sewing success: How textile industry is helping to reduce poverty

Apparel is one of the first manufacturing sectors to emerge in poor countries, often providing jobs to low-skilled (mostly female) workers that have few paid employment alternatives. Although salaries are low by international standards, apparel workers tend to make more money than they would in other activities—low-skill agriculture and services—in the domestic market. So for millions of poor, unskilled workers, textile manufacturing is a gateway to start getting out of poverty.

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Sewing success: How textile industry is helping to reduce poverty

Apparel is one of the first manufacturing sectors to emerge in poor countries, often providing jobs to low-skilled (mostly female) workers that have few paid employment alternatives. Although salaries are low by international standards, apparel workers tend to make more money than they would in other activities—low-skill agriculture and services—in the domestic market. So for millions of poor, unskilled workers, textile manufacturing is a gateway to start getting out of poverty.

Read More


Key to ending poverty via the textile industry

Textiles played a dominant role in lifting people from extreme poverty, for women's empowerment and for economic development, more than a century ago in today's wealthy countries. And textiles still are. But there are trade-offs. New business models and steep growth of the industry are putting pressure on people and nature. This article explains how the textile industry can reduce poverty.

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